Lawyer: Georgia prosecutor seeking info about R. Kelly

#MuteRKelly supporters protest outside R. Kelly's studio Wednesday night, Jan. 9, 2019, in Chicago. Lifetime's "Surviving R. Kelly" series which aired earlier this month, looks at the singer's history and allegations that he has sexually abused women and girls. Kelly, who turned 52 on Tuesday, has denied wrongdoing. (Ashlee Rezin/Chicago Sun-Times via AP)

A lawyer who represents a couple who appeared in a recent documentary detailing abuse allegations against R. Kelly says prosecutors in Georgia have reached out to him

STOCKBRIDGE, Ga. — A lawyer representing a couple who appeared in a recent documentary detailing abuse allegations against R. Kelly said prosecutors in Georgia have reached out to him.

Atlanta-based lawyer Gerald Griggs represents Timothy and Jonjelyn Savage, who have said repeatedly that Kelly has kept their daughter from contacting them and has brainwashed her. The Savages, who live in Stockbridge, just south of Atlanta, appeared in Lifetime's "Surviving R. Kelly" series.

The series, which aired earlier this month, looks at the singer's history and allegations that he has sexually abused women and girls. Kelly, who turned 52 on Tuesday, has denied wrongdoing.

Savage and his wife have said they haven't heard from their daughter in about two years.

The Lifetime series reported that their daughter has repeatedly denied that Kelly has done anything wrong and has said she doesn't want to talk to her family.

Griggs said the Fulton County district attorney's office reached out to him on Monday seeking contact information for witnesses. Griggs said Fulton County investigators "haven't confirmed or denied an investigation."

Chris Hopper, a spokesman, for the Fulton County district attorney's office, declined to comment.

Griggs said he has also been contacted by prosecutors in Kelly's hometown of Chicago. Cook County State's Attorney Kim Foxx addressed reporters Tuesday afternoon after her office had been inundated with calls about the allegations in the documentary, some tied to his Chicago-area home.

But Foxx also said there's no active investigation of Kelly and launching one would require victims and witnesses.

WMAQ-TV reported that Foxx's office said Wednesday it has received calls after Foxx asked the public to come forward with information about potential victims of the singer. The office said it is "reviewing and following up" on the calls, but has no additional information at this time.

Kelly's Chicago attorney, Steve Greenberg, said in a phone interview Tuesday evening that the allegations in the Lifetime documentary were false. He also said it was inappropriate for a state's attorney to characterize allegations she'd seen on TV, prior to charges or even an investigation.

Also in Chicago, according to WMAQ, police confirmed Wednesday that they conducted a "business check" at Kelly's recording studio on the city's West Side but "have no criminal complaints from anyone about the location."

Timothy Savage told a police officer on Jan. 3 that Don Russell, whom he identified as Kelly's manager, had texted him saying it would be best for him and his family if the documentary didn't air, according to a Henry County police report.

Russell called Savage while the officer was there and Savage put the phone on speaker so the officer could listen, the police report says. It went on to say that Russell accused Savage of lying to Lifetime and said that if Savage continued to support the series, Russell and Kelly would be forced to release information that would show Savage was a liar and that would ruin him, his reputation, his business and his family.

Contact information for Russell could not be immediately found.

Savage also called police in May to report that a man named James Mason had threatened him because Savage was trying to reach his daughter, who he said was being held by Kelly, according to a police report. The report doesn't say what the relationship between Mason and Kelly is.

Savage told the officer that Mason had called him around 3:10 p.m. on May 23 and said, "I'm gonna do harm to you and your family, when I see you I'm gonna get you, I'm gonna (expletive) kill you."

Capt. Joey Smith with the Henry County Police Department confirmed by email Wednesday that a magistrate judge had issued a warrant for Mason on charges of terroristic threats and acts. The email says detectives would like to meet with Mason to "review his version of events." The Henry County Sheriff's Office said no one by that name has been arrested since the warrant was issued last year.

Mason did not respond to an email Wednesday seeking comment.

A Cook County jury acquitted Kelly of all 14 counts of child pornography in 2008. Prosecutors had argued a videotape showed him engaged in graphic sex acts with a girl as young as 13. Kelly and the alleged victim, in her 20s at the time of the trial, denied it was them in the video.

Kelly rose from poverty on Chicago's South Side to become a star singer, songwriter and producer. Despite his legal troubles a decade ago, he still retains a following.

Kelly won a Grammy in 1997 for "I Believe I Can Fly," and is known for such raunchy hits as "Bump N' Grind" and "Ignition."

Related News

2 Fox News execs named co-presidents, will report to Murdoch

Aug 12, 2016

Rupert Murdoch moves to set up a new management structure at Fox News following Roger Ailes' departure amid sexual harassment allegations

Is NBC's prime-time Olympics due for a change?

Aug 12, 2016

For all the changes media and even Olympics coverage, NBC sticks to a time-honored formula for its prime-time broadcast

After storm halts tribute, A-Rod doubles in Yanks' finale

Aug 13, 2016

His pregame tribute ended by a storm, Alex Rodriguez began his final game with the New York Yankees by hitting a tying first-inning double

Hollywood in five is your 5 minutes read of Hollywood news with continual updated coverage.

Contact us: sales@hollywoodinfive.com